“TARMAC” is School’s “Newest” Space

Recognizing that the school’s Digital Resource Center was more than just a place with computers, Principal Steve Stewart encouraged the Student Council to conduct a name search and rebrand the space. They conducted a poll, and the winning name is TARMAC – Tutor, Activity, Relax, Meet, and Collaborate.

In keeping with the school’s “Pilot” theme, TARMAC seems the most fitting. The school’s newspaper, also presented electronically, is called the “Co-Pilot.” The school’s bookstore is “The Pilot Hangar.”

Although the word TARMAC is actually the name for a construction material that covers concrete surfaces, it does imply an area where you can “land.”

  • Place to explore personal interests (makerspace, colleges, careers
  • Place to socialize with peers
  • Place to temporarily unwind and relax
  • Place for quiet student study
  • Place to have study groups
  • Place where students, staff, teachers interact
  • Place to hold large class instruction and school meetings
  • Additional place for peer to peer tutoring
  • Place to utilize our technology
  • Greater personalization for individual student needs and experiences

Process Involved All

Student Council President Jared LaRue was careful to involve all students, as well as the Student Council representatives, in the process.

He began with an email to all students, soliciting name suggestions on the “whiteboard” in the Quiet Study Room of the DRC. From the approximately one dozen suggestions over a few weeks’ period in September, the Student Council representatives narrowed the selections to four: The Tarmac, Flight Deck, The Terminal, Pilot Activities Center. Then the Student Council sent an email poll to all students, with TARMAC as the preferred name.

“This was a great process involving students,” said Jared. “I’m happy it all worked.”

What Happened to the Library?

Since De La Salle Collegiate’s establishment in 1926, the school has always had a library. A few years ago, the library transformed, as more and more research materials were available online. Google searches have replaced the standard “Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature,” a resource that for decades served students.

Furthermore, magazines and newspapers have online versions, and college catalogs – once large, thick, glossy “doorstops” – are also “in the cloud.”

Thus, a new name, the “Digital Resource Center, DRC” replaced Library in the De La Salle lexicon.

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